Password for the Afterlife?

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Thursday, 06 May 2010 12:51

Sitting in the office last week, Michelle received a suggestion from LinkedIn to connect with a man she knew had passed away some time ago.

Clearly, he was not going to be able to contact her.  This reminded me of a recent news interview I saw with a company called Death Switch.

Most of us have multiple online accounts for such things as banking, FaceBook, Twitter, LinkedIn, online calendars, multiple e-mail accounts and the like.  How many usernames and passwords do you really have? If you are a business owner, how many usernames and passwords are vital for keeping your business moving?  What would happen to all of your assets on the internet if you were no longer here?  Who would know how to disable or continue your transactions on the web?

The revolutionary advances in technology have pushed us to this point. More and more crucial business information has taken a digital form.  For your coworkers and family to continue on with your business you need to have a plan. You wouldn’t want your information living in “Internet purgatory” waiting for someone else to determine what happens next. Well the good news is that there are companies out there now that offer a secure repository for all of this information. You export all of your important information into their secure database and assign a beneficiary. You also configure how often the computer prompts you for your password. If you don’t respond after the predetermined length of time the plan is set in motion and your “next of kin” are contacted with your wishes.

Here are two companies, Death Switch and Legacy Locker that I found in my quick search who specialize in this new way of digital safeguarding. Each one has their own unique format for users. Please do the research for yourself to find the best solution for securing your online legacy.

We don’t know how many more minutes we have on this Earth and I think we should all plan ahead for those we leave behind.
~Kristen Price